SOUPS 2022 Technical Sessions

The technical sessions will be presented both in person and live streamed. Other program components that are available for virtual attendees are marked as “Virtual” below, and in-person attendees are welcome to join in.

Monday, August 8

7:45 am–9:00 am

Continental Breakfast

7:45 am–9:00 am

Virtual Poster Session

Check out the cool new ideas and the latest preliminary research on display at the Virtual Poster Session. A list of accepted posters will be available soon.

9:00 am–9:15 am

Opening Remarks and Awards

General Chairs: Sonia Chiasson, Carleton University, and Apu Kapadia, Indiana University Bloomington

9:15 am–10:30 am

Expertise and Learning

"I don’t know why I check this...'' - Investigating Expert Users' Strategies to Detect Email Signature Spoofing Attacks

Peter Mayer, SECUSO, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology; Damian Poddebniak, Münster University of Applied Sciences; Konstantin Fischer and Marcus Brinkmann, Ruhr University Bochum; Juraj Somorovsky, Paderborn University; Angela Sasse, Ruhr University Bochum; Sebastian Schinzel, Münster University of Applied Sciences; Melanie Volkamer, SECUSO, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology

10:30 am–11:00 am

Break with Refreshments

11:00 am–12:30 pm

User Understanding of Security and Privacy Concepts

12:30 pm–1:45 pm

Monday Luncheon and In-Person Mentoring Tables

See the Mentoring Program page for more information.

12:30 pm–1:15 pm

Virtual Mentoring Table

See the Mentoring Program page for more information.

1:45 pm–2:45 pm

Keynote Address

Understanding and Reducing Online Misinformation Across 16 Countries on Six Continents

David Rand, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

The spread of misinformation online is a global problem that requires global solutions. To that end, we conducted an experiment in 16 countries across 6 continents (N = 33,480) to investigate predictors of susceptibility to misinformation and interventions to combat misinformation. In every country, participants with a more analytic cognitive style and stronger accuracy-related motivations were better at discerning truth from falsehood; valuing democracy was also associated with greater truth discernment whereas political conservatism was negatively associated with truth discernment in most countries. Subtly prompting people to think about accuracy was broadly effective at improving the veracity of news that people were willing to share, as were minimal digital literacy tips. Finally, crowdsourced accuracy evaluation was able to differentiate true from false headlines with high accuracy in all countries. The consistent patterns we observe suggest that the psychological factors underlying the misinformation challenge are similar across the globe, and that similar solutions may be broadly effective.

Pre-print PDF: https://psyarxiv.com/a9frz/
Summary tweet thread: https://twitter.com/DG_Rand/status/1493946312353619981?s=20

David Rand, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

David Rand is the Erwin H. Schell Professor and Professor of Management Science and Brain and Cognitive Sciences at MIT. Bridging the fields of cognitive science, behavioral economics, and social psychology, David’s research combines behavioral experiments and online/field studies with mathematical/computational models to understand human decision-making. His work focuses on illuminating why people believe and share misinformation and "fake news"; understanding political psychology and polarization; and promoting human cooperation. He has published over 170 articles in peer-reviewed journals such Nature, Science, PNAS, the American Economic Review, Psychological Science, Management Science, New England Journal of Medicine, and the American Journal of Political Science, and his work has received widespread media attention. David regularly advises technology companies such as Google, Facebook, and Twitter in their efforts to combat misinformation, and has provided testimony about misinformation to the US and UK governments. He has also written for popular press outlets including the New York Times, Wired, and New Scientist. He was named to Wired magazine’s Smart List 2012 of "50 people who will change the world," chosen as a 2012 Pop!Tech Science Fellow, awarded the 2015 Arthur Greer Memorial Prize for Outstanding Scholarly Research, chosen as fact-checking researcher of the year in 2017 by the Poyner Institute’s International Fact-Checking Network, awarded the 2020 FABBS Early Career Impact Award from the Society for Judgment and Decision Making, and selected as a 2021 Best 40-Under-40 Business School Professor by Poets & Quants. Papers he has coauthored have been awarded Best Paper of the Year in Experimental Economics, Social Cognition, and Political Methodology.

2:45 pm–3:15 pm

Lightning Talks

3:15 pm–3:45 pm

Break with Refreshments

3:45 pm–5:00pm

Privacy and Security Tools

5:00 pm–5:45 pm

Virtual Mentoring Table

See the Mentoring Program page for more information.

5:30 pm–6:45 pm

In-Person Poster Session

Check out the cool new ideas and the latest preliminary research on display at the In-Person Poster Session. A list of accepted posters will be available soon.

Tuesday, August 9

8:00 am–9:00 am

Continental Breakfast

8:00 am–8:45 am

Virtual Speed Mentoring

See the Mentoring Program page for more information.

9:00 am–10:00 am

Methods

10:00 am–10:30 am

Lightning Talks

10:30 am–11:00 am

Break with Refreshments

11:00 am–12:30 pm

Understanding Specific User Populations and Behaviors

12:30 pm–1:45 pm

Tuesday Luncheon and In-Person Speed Mentoring Tables

See the Mentoring Program page for more information.

1:45 pm–3:15 PM

Passwords and Authentication

Let The Right One In: Attestation as a Usable CAPTCHA Alternative

Tara Whalen, Thibault Meunier, and Mrudula Kodali, Cloudflare Inc.; Alex Davidson, Brave; Marwan Fayed and Armando Faz-Hernández, Cloudflare Inc.; Watson Ladd, Sealance Corp; Deepak Maram, Cornell Tech; Nick Sullivan, Benedikt Christoph Wolters, Maxime Guerreiro, and Andrew Galloni, Cloudflare Inc.

3:15 pm–3:45 pm

Break with Refreshments

3:45 pm–5:00 pm

IoT and Ubiquitous Computing

Being Hacked: Understanding Victims' Experiences of IoT Hacking

Asreen Rostami, RISE Research Institutes of Sweden & Stockholm University; Minna Vigren, Stockholm University; Shahid Raza, RISE Research Institutes of Sweden; Barry Brown, Department of Computer Science, University of Copenhagen & Stockholm University

5:00 pm–5:15 pm

Closing Remarks

General Chairs: Sonia Chiasson, Carleton University, and Apu Kapadia, Indiana University Bloomington