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LISA '99: 13th Systems Administration Conference
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Tutorials: Overview | By Day (Sunday, Monday, Tuesday) | By Instructor | All in One File

Sunday, November 7, 1999    
Full-Day Tutorials
S1 Administering Windows NT: A Course for UNIX People
Aeleen Frisch, Exponential Consulting
S2 Linux Systems Administration
Bryan C. Andregg, Red Hat Software
S3 Designing Resilient Distributed Systems--High Availability
Evan Marcus, Veritas Software
S4 Modern Security Systems for Intranets, Extranets, and the Internet - NEW
Daniel E. Geer, Jr., CertCo, LLC, and Jon Rochlis, Consultant
S5 Network Security Profiles: A Collection (Hodgepodge) of Stuff Hackers Know About You
Brad Johnson, SystemExperts Corporation
S6 Sendmail Configuration and Operation (Updated for Sendmail 8.10)
Eric Allman, Sendmail, Inc.
S7 Advanced Topics in Perl Programming - NEW
Tom Christiansen, Consultant
Half-Day Tutorials - Morning
S8am Configuring and Administering SAMBA Servers - NEW
Gerald Carter, Auburn University
S9am Introduction to Domain Name System Administration
William LeFebvre, Group sys Consulting
S10am Legal Issues for System Administrators - NEW
Daniel Appelman, Heller, Ehrman, White, and McAuliffe
Half-Day Tutorials - Afternoon
S11pm Using Amd and the Automounter Utilities - NEW
Erez Zadok, Columbia University
S12pm Intermediate Topics in Domain Name System Administration
William LeFebvre, Group sys Consulting
S13pm The First Amendment and the System Administrator - NEW
Daniel Appelman, Heller, Ehrman, White, and McAuliffe


S1 Administering Windows NT: A Course for UNIX People
Aeleen Frisch, Exponential Consulting

Who should attend: UNIX system administrators who are also responsible for Windows NT systems (or who may become responsible for them). Students attending this class should be comfortable with general system administration concepts (file systems, processes, user accounts, backups, and the like), as well as the major tools and procedures used to manage them on UNIX systems. A sense of humor will also be beneficial when initially approaching Windows NT.

The primary goal of this course is to help you apply what you already know about systems administration under UNIX to the tasks and challenges of the Windows NT environment, in an effort to make that transition as easy and painless as possible. The course will include a variety of real-world examples and will focus on practical techniques and strategies for NT systems administration. You can expect a very fast-paced, information-rich course. This class focuses on NT 4.0, but will discuss Win2000 as appropriate.

Topics include:

  • A walking tour of a Windows NT server
    • The NT worldview (WNT = ? VMS++)
    • The client-server system model and its implications
    • Filesystem layout and essential system files
    • Processes under NT
    • Don't forget that it's a PC
  • Tools to aid in NT systems administration
    • What NT supplies
    • Commercial products and freely available software
    • Making NT act like UNIX
  • Booting under Windows NT
    • Normal startup and shutdown
    • Troubleshooting hints and strategies
    • Multi-OS system configurations
  • Managing user accounts
    • Mechanisms and procedures
    • NT groups
    • Security and user accounts
  • Disks and file systems on Windows NT systems
    • The NTFS file system
    • Spanning disk partitions
    • Fault-tolerance capabilities
    • Networking under NT: connecting to UNIX and other systems
    • What NT provides
    • NT and UNIX networks
    • Connecting to Windows systems
    • Filling in what NT is missing
    • Printing on and from Windows NT systems
    • Local printing
    • Printers and networks
    • Going to and from UNIX systems
    • Overview of Windows NT security
    • NT's view of system and network security
    • Controlling access to system resources
    • System monitoring and security

Aeleen Frisch (S1, M9am, M12pm) has been a system frisch_aeleen administrator for over 15 years. She currently looks after a very heterogeneous network of UNIX and Windows NT systems. She is the author of several books, including Essential Windows NT System Administration.





S2 Linux Systems Administration
Bryan C. Andregg, Red Hat Software

Who should attend: This tutorial is directed at system administrators who are planning on implementing a Linux solution in a production environment. Course attendees should be familiar with the basics of systems administration in a UNIX®/Linux® environment: user-level commands, administration commands, and TCP/IP networking. The novice administrator and the guru should both leave the tutorial having learned something.

From a single server to a network of workstations, the Linux environment can be a daunting task for administrators knowledgeable in other platforms. Starting with a single server and ending with a multi-server 1000+ user environment, case studies will provide practical information for using Linux in the real world.

Topics include (with special emphasis on security):

  • Installation features
  • Disk partitioning and RAID
  • Networking
  • User accounts
  • Services
  • NFS and NIS
  • High availability environments
  • The workplace
  • Up and coming in the Linux world (CODA, LVM, etc.)

Upon completion of the course, attendees should feel confident in their ability to set up and maintain a secure and useful Linux network. The tutorial will be conducted in an open manner that allows for questions at all times.

Bryan C. Andregg (S2) is the Director of MIS at Red andregg_bryan Hat Software, where he has held that position for almost two years. During that time he has overseen combining two nationally distinct offices and moving the entire organization twice and has finally been allowed to hire an assistant.




S3 Designing Resilient Distributed Systems--High Availability
Evan Marcus, Veritas Software

Who should attend: Beginning and intermediate UNIX system and network administrators, and UNIX developers concerned with building applications that can be deployed and managed in a highly resilient manner. A basic understanding of UNIX system programming, UNIX shell programming, and network environments is required.

This course will explore procedures and techniques for designing, building, and managing predictable, resilient UNIX-based systems in a distributed environment. Hardware redundancy, system redundancy, monitoring and verification techniques, network implications, and system and application programming issues will all be addressed. We will discuss the trade-offs among cost, reliability, and complexity.

Topics include:

  • What is high availability? Who needs it?
  • Defining uptime and cost; "big rules" of system design
  • Disk and data redundancy; RAID and SCSI arrays
  • Host redundancy in HA configurations
  • Network dependencies
  • Application system programming concerns
  • Anatomy of failovers: applications, systems, management tools
  • Planning disaster recovery sites and data updates
  • Security implications
  • Upgrade and patch strategies
  • Backup systems: off-site storage, redundancy, and disaster recovery issues
  • Managing the system: managers, processes, verification

Evan Marcus (S3) is a senior systems engineer and marcus_evan_l high availability specialist with VERITAS Software Corporation. Evan has more than 12 years of experience in UNIX systems administration. While employed at Fusion Systems and OpenVision Software, Evan worked to bring the first high availability software application for SunOS and Solaris to market. Evan is the author of several articles and talks on the design of high availability systems.



S4 Modern Security Systems for Intranets, Extranets, and the Internet NEW
Daniel E. Geer, Jr., CertCo, LLC, and Jon Rochlis, Consultant

In today's fast-moving Internet and client-server world, security is a critical component of most systems. But security systems are complex and confusing. Different systems provide overlapping functionality, and what's popular today may be gone tomorrow. This course describes many of today's most popular network security systems. We describe how the various security protocols work, what value they provide, and how difficult they are to implement. The goal: attendees should be well equipped to understand which protocols are applicable to their environments and systems, which to pursue in more detail, and which are likely to be just a flash in the pan.

Topics include:

  • Internet/intranet security--confidentiality, authentication, integrity, authorization
  • Fundamental technology--encryption, public key, private key, certification
  • Low-security systems--basic WWW/HTTP, cookies, classic remote login (telnet/rlogin/rsh), file transfer
  • Secure Socket Layer (SSL) for securing HTTP
  • Kerberos-based systems--intranet cross-application private key, including MS-DCE and Microsoft NT5
  • Secure Shell (SSH)--remote login and lots more
  • Email--PGP & S/Mime
  • VPNs--IPsec, remote access
  • Payment protocols--Digicash, SET (Visa/Mastercard), and more

Daniel E. Geer, Jr. (S4), Sc.D., is vice-president of geer_dan CertCo, LLC, market leader in digital certification. Dr. Geer has a long history in network security and distributed computing management as an entrepreneur, consultant, teacher, and architect. He holds a Bachelor of Science in electrical engineering and computer science from MIT, and a Doctor of Science in biostatistics from Harvard University. A frequent speaker, popular teacher, and member of several professional societies, he is active in USENIX, where he has participated in virtually every activity, including serving as technical program chair for the San Diego, California, 1993 Winter Technical Conference, as well as conference chair for both the First Symposium on Mobile and Location Independent Computing and the First USENIX Workshop on Electronic Commerce. He was elected to the Board of Directors in June 1994 and began an elected two-year term as vice-president in June 1996. He is the co-author of Wiley's Web Security Sourcebook (June 1997).

Jon Rochlis (S4) is a senior consultant for rochlis_jon_a SystemExperts Corp. He and his colleagues provide high-level advice to businesses large and small in the areas of network security, distributed systems design and management, high availability, and electronic commerce. Before joining SystemExperts, Mr. Rochlis was engineering manager with BBN Planet, a major national Internet service provider.



S5 Network Security Profiles: A Collection (Hodgepodge) of Stuff Hackers Know About You
Brad Johnson, SystemExperts Corporation

Who should attend: Network, system, and firewall administrators; security auditors and those who are audited; people involved with responding to intrusions or responsible for network-based applications or systems that might be targets for hackers. Participants should understand the basics of TCP/IP networking. Examples will use actual tools and will also include small amounts of HTML, JavaScript, and Tcl.

This course will be useful for anyone with any TCP/IP-based system--a UNIX, Windowsxx, Windows NT, or mainframe operating system, or a router, firewall, or gateway network host.

Whether network-based host intrusions come from the Internet, an extranet, or an intranet, they typically follow a common methodology: reconnaissance, vulnerability research, and exploitation. This tutorial will review the tools and techniques hackers (determined intruders) use to perform these activities. You will learn what types of protocols and tools they use, and you will become familiar with a number of current methods and exploits. The course will show how you can generate vulnerability profiles of your own systems. Additionally, it will review some of the important management policies and issues related to these network-based probes.

The course will focus primarily on tools that exploit many of the common TCP/IP based protocols, such as WWW, SSL, DNS, ICMP, and SNMP, that underlie virtually all Internet applications, including Web technologies, network management, and remote file systems. Some topics will be addressed at a detailed technical level. This course will concentrate on examples drawn from public domain tools, because these tools are widely available and commonly used by hackers (and are free for you to use).

Topics include:

  • Profiles: what can an intruder determine about your site remotely?
  • Review of profiling methodologies: different "viewpoints" generate different types of profiling information
  • Techniques: scanning, on-line research, TCP/IP protocol "mis"uses, denial of service, hacking clubs
  • Important intrusion areas: discovery techniques, SSL, SNMP, WWW, DNS
  • Tools, including scotty, strobe, netcat, SATAN, SAINT, ISS, mscan, sscan, queso, curl, Nmap, and SSLeay/upget
  • Management issues: defining policies and requirements to minimize intrusion risk

Topics not covered:

  • Social engineering
  • Buffer overflow exploits
  • Browser (frame) exploits
  • Shell privilege escalation

Brad Johnson (S5) is a principal of SystemExperts johnson_bradC Corporation, a consulting firm that specializes in system security and management. He is a well-known authority in the field of secure distributed systems and has recently served as a technical advisor to both Dateline NBC and CNN on network security matters. He has participated in seminal industry initiatives, including the Open Software Foundation, X/Open, and the IETF, and has often published about open systems.


S6 Sendmail Configuration and Operation (Updated for Sendmail 8.10)
Eric Allman, Sendmail, Inc.

Who should attend: System administrators who want to learn more about the sendmail program, particularly details of configuration and operational issues (this tutorial will not cover mail front ends). This will be an intense, fast-paced, full-day tutorial for people who have already been exposed to sendmail. This tutorial describes the latest release of sendmail from Berkeley, version 8.10.

We begin by introducing a bit of the philosophy and history underlying sendmail.

Topics include:

  • The basic concepts of configuration: mailers, options, macros, classes, keyed files (databases), and rewriting rules and rulesets
  • Configuring sendmail using the M4 macro package
  • Day-to-day management issues, including alias and forward files, "special" recipients (files, programs, and include files), mailing lists, command line flags, tuning, and security
  • How sendmail interacts with the Domain Name System

Eric Allman (S6, M8am) is the original author of send allman_eric mail. He was the chief programmer on the INGRES database management project and an early contributor to the UNIX effort at Berkeley, authoring syslog, tset, the -me troff macros, and trek. He designed database user and application interfaces at Britton Lee (later Sharebase) and contributed to the Ring Array Processor project for neural-network-based speech recognition at the International Computer Science Institute. He is a former member of the USENIX Board of Directors.


S7 Advanced Topics in Perl Programming NEW
Tom Christiansen, Consultant

Who should attend: Experienced Perl programmers interested in honing their existing Perl skills for quick prototyping, system utilities, software tools, system management tasks, database access, and WWW programming. Students should have used Perl for basic scripting for several months before taking this course.

Topics include:

  • Exceptions and eval
  • References
  • Complex data structures
  • Modules
  • Object-oriented programming
  • Networking
  • Database access
  • Advanced I/O techniques and file locking
  • Assorted tips and tricks

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Develop standard- and OO-modules for code reuse
  • Understand complex and hierarchical data structures
  • Understand runtime eval and exception handling
  • Understand Perl's facilities for file locking
  • Use Perl for client-server programming
  • Use Perl for database access (new and existing)

Tom Christiansen (S7) has been involved with Perl christiansen_tom since day zero of its initial public release in 1987. Lead author of The Perl Cookbook, co-author of the second editions of Programming Perl and Learning Perl, and co-author of Learning Perl on Win32 Systems, Tom is also the managing editor of the www.perl.com Web site, major caretaker of Perl's online documentation, originator and co-maintainer of the Perl Frequently Asked Questions list, and president of The Perl Journal. Tom served two terms on the USENIX Board of Directors. He holds undergraduate degrees in computer science and Spanish and a master's in computer science from the University of Wisconsin at Madison. He now lives in Boulder, Colorado.


S8am Configuring and Administering SAMBA Servers NEW
Gerald Carter, Auburn University

Who should attend: This tutorial is intended for system and network administrators who wish to integrate SAMBA running on a UNIX-based machine with Microsoft Windows clients. No familarity with Windows networking concepts will be assumed.

SAMBA is a freely available suite of programs that allows UNIX-based machines to provide file and print services to Microsoft Windows PCs without installing any third-party software on the clients. This allows users to access necessary resources from both PCs and UNIX workstations. As SAMBA makes its way into more and more network shops all over the world, it is common to see "configuring SAMBA servers" listed as a desired skill on many job descriptions for network administrators.

This tutorial will use real-world examples taken from daily administrative tasks.

Topics include:

  • Installing SAMBA from the ground up
  • Understanding the basic Microsoft networking protocols and concepts, such
    as NetBIOS, CIFS, and Windows NT domains
  • Configuring a UNIX box to provide remote access to local files and printers from Microsoft Windows clients
  • Utilizing tools to access files on Windows servers from a UNIX client
  • Configuring SAMBA as a member of a Windows NT domain in order to utilize the domain's PDC for user authentication
  • Using SAMBA as a domain controller
  • Configuring SAMBA to participate in network browsing
  • Automating the daily tasks of managing SAMBA

Gerald Carter (S8am) has been a member of the carter_gerald SAMBA Team since 1998. However, he has been maintaining SAMBA servers for the past four years. Currently employed as a network manager by the College of Engineering at Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama, Gerald daily maintains approximately 600 PCs running a melting pot of Microsoft operating systems and 30 Solaris 2.x servers running SAMBA. He recently acted as the lead author for Teach Yourself SAMBA in 24 Hours (Sams Publishing) and writes regularly for the Web-based magazine LinuxWorld on Linux and Windows NT integration.


S9am Introduction to Domain Name System Administration
William LeFebvre, Group sys Consulting

Who should attend: System or network administrators who have never been exposed to DNS, except as users. A basic understanding of the IP protocols, TCP and UDP, data encapsulation, and the seven-layer model will be beneficial.

The Domain Name System (DNS) is the primary method the Internet uses to name and number machines. It is used to translate names like "www.usenix.org" into addresses like 131.106.3.253. The DNS is critical to the operation of the Internet. Any site that is serious about joining the Internet community will need to understand how to configure and administer DNS.

This course will describe the basic operation of DNS and will provide instructions and guidelines for the configuration and operation of DNS on UNIX platforms using the BIND software distribution. This class is designed for the beginner and is intended to provide a foundation for the class on "Intermediate Topics in Domain Name System Administration."

Topics include:

  • DNS and BIND
  • The DNS Name Hierarchy
  • The four components of the DNS protocol
  • Query methods--iterative versus recursive
  • Essential resource records: SOA, A, PTR, CNAME, NS
  • Zone transfers and secondaries
  • Vendor-specific differences

William LeFebvre (S9am, S12pm, M6) has been using lefebvre_bill UNIX and Internet technologies since 1983. He has written many articles on UNIX, networking, and systems administration issues. Currently he writes the monthly "Daemons & Dragons" column for UNIX Review. William is the editor of the SAGE series "Short Topics in System Administration." He has taught tutorials since 1989 for such organizations as USENIX, the Sun User Group (SUG), MIS Training Institute, IT Forum, and Great Circle Associates, and he is a certified Cisco Systems Instructor. William is the primary programmer for the popular UNIX utility top and has contributed to several widely used UNIX packages, including Wietse Venema's logdaemon package. He can be reached at wnl@groupsys.com or via http://www.groupsys.com/.


S10am Legal Issues for System Administrators NEW
Daniel Appelman, Heller, Ehrman, White, and McAuliffe

Who should attend: This tutorial is designed for system administrators at all levels of experience and without regard to particular employment situations. Of course, the legal situation of the system administrator and the appropriate resolution of legal issues may vary depending on many factors, including the status of the employer. We will attempt to address these variations as they become relevant during the tutorial.

This course discusses the laws of cyberspace, with particular emphasis on the rights and liabilities of system administrators. The format is a presentation by the instructor, with plenty of time to ask questions. The course aims to provide attendees with a better understanding of how the law views system administrators, of the sensitive legal issues and potential liabilities they face, and of the concrete steps they can take to help their employers minimize their liability.

Topics include:

  • Overview of the law and its effect on system administrators
  • Privacy rights in cyberspace
  • Employer rights vs. employee rights
  • Defamation liability
  • Intellectual property rights
  • Your responsibilities on the job: what to do and what not to do
  • How to deal with potential legal issues as they arise

Daniel Appelman (S10am, S13pm) is a lawyer with a appelman_dan major Silicon Valley law firm. He has been practicing in the areas of cyberspace and software law for over fifteen years. Dan is the attorney for the USENIX Association and for many high-tech companies.





S11pm Using Amd and the Automounter Utilities NEW
Erez Zadok, Columbia University

Who should attend: System administrators and managers who maintain large heterogeneous sites. These sites often use the Amd automounter to provide a uniform, sitewide filesystem hierarchy. Participants should know the basics of NFS and other file systems, but expertise is not required. Prior use of Amd or experience with Amd is not required.

Amd is an automounter daemon used by administrators at many sites to provide a uniform filesystem mount strategy. Amd is particularly useful at large sites with two or more UNIX systems, because, unlike vendor-supplied automounters, it works the same for all platforms. Amd is also useful on systems whose vendors do not supply an automounter. Amd is a complex tool that supports many features. Its map syntax has numerous capabilities. Often you can achieve the same goal in several different ways. Careless use of Amd, however, can result in user-visible delays or even system hangs.

This tutorial's main focus is the efficient, long-running use of Amd. Many examples will be provided to illustrate each feature discussed.

Topics include:

  • Writing and debugging Amd maps and configuration files
  • Using special map features to shorten maps
  • How to choose among the many map features
  • How to make Amd run faster
  • Testing and configuration techniques to improve stability
  • Recovery from system lockups and Amd hangs

Participants will learn useful techniques: how to run Amd efficiently, how to write shorter and more clever maps, how to use the many (new) advanced features and tools that come with am-utils, and how to debug and test their configurations.

Erez Zadok (S11pm) began maintaining Amd in 1992. zadok_erez Starting in 1996, he rewrote large parts of Amd and converted it to use Autoconf tools. Numerous new features and ports have since been added. The package, now called am-utils, contains additional tools written by Erez (e.g., hlfsd). Erez is a Ph.D. student in Columbia University's Computer Science Department. Erez has been researching file systems and cross-platform filesystem extensibility since 1989.



S12pm Intermediate Topics in Domain Name System Administration
William LeFebvre, Group sys Consulting

Who should attend: Network administrators with a basic understanding of DNS and its configuration should consider attending this course. Those whose experience is limited to administering a single domain will learn how to create and delegate subdomains. Administrators planning to install and use BIND 8 will also benefit. Attendees are expected either to have prior experience with the domain name system, including an understanding of basic operation and zone transfers, or to have attended the "Introduction to Domain Name System Administration."

Once an administrator has a basic understanding of DNS, additional information and techniques are required to utilize the system's potential fully. Attendees will be taken beyond the basics into a more thorough understanding of the overall design and implementation of the domain name system.

Topics include:

  • Subdomains and delegation
  • Resource records: NS, RP, MX, TXT, AAAA
  • Migration to BIND 8
  • DNS management tools
  • DNS design
  • DNS and firewalls

William LeFebvre (S9am, S12pm, M6) has been using lefebvre_bill UNIX and Internet technologies since 1983. He has written many articles on UNIX, networking, and systems administration issues. Currently he writes the monthly "Daemons & Dragons" column for UNIX Review. William is the editor of the SAGE series "Short Topics in System Administration." He has taught tutorials since 1989 for such organizations as USENIX, the Sun User Group (SUG), MIS Training Institute, IT Forum, and Great Circle Associates, and he is a certified Cisco Systems Instructor. William is the primary programmer for the popular UNIX utility top and has contributed to several widely used UNIX packages, including Wietse Venema's logdaemon package. He can be reached at wnl@groupsys.com or via http://www.groupsys.com/.


S13pm The First Amendment and the System Administrator NEW
Daniel Appelman, Heller, Ehrman, White, and McAuliffe

Who should attend: This tutorial is designed for system administrators at all levels of experience and without regard to particular employment situations. Of course, the legal situation of the system administrator and the appropriate resolution of legal issues may vary depending on many factors including the status of the employer. We will attempt to address these variations as they become relevant during the tutorial.

System administrators are often faced with conflicting demands and issues. Of particular importance are the conflicting expectations of users and employers concerning rights and responsibilities in using network facilities and the Internet. Often these expectations have legal dimensions and involve real or potential liabilities.

This tutorial focuses on the First Amendment (free speech) rights of users and how those rights sometimes conflict with other rights, such as the right to privacy, the right to some recourse against defamation and the distribution of obscenity, and the rights of employers to control their networks and the activities of their employees. Particular emphasis will be put on addressing how far the system administrator's duties go in policing and enforcing the rights of others. We will discuss real-life situations and the methodology for analyzing and resolving legal issues.

Daniel Appelman (S10am, S13pm) is a lawyer with a appelman_dan major Silicon Valley law firm. He has been practicing in the areas of cyberspace and software law for over fifteen years. Dan is the attorney for the USENIX Association and for many high-tech companies.






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